LMCC

CanadaQBank: www.fmeq.ca/canadaqbank

The LMCC (Licenciate of the Medical Council of Canada) is the nickname given by the vast majority of students to the Medical Council of Canada competency examination (CMC). The LMCC – so actually the MCCQE – is divided into two parts.

 

The LMCC I is a multiple choice theory test, done on computer, provided to all graduates in medicine across Canada. The LMCC II is an ECOS style examination (Objective Structured Clinical Examination) which is granted in the first year of residence. After two successful tests, the Medical Council of Canada gives the candidate the title of the Medical Council of Canada Licensee and registered in the register of the Council.

The objectives of the LMCC are available on the CMC website: LMCC goals.

 

In addition to the famous Toronto Notes, other books are recommended for the study of the LMCC.

FMEQ partnered with the CanadaQBank to offer to all its members free access to this extensive question bank that lists more than 4,000 issues (multiple choice, clinical cases, with answers and explanations). To access it, click here!

The LMCC (Licenciate of the Medical Council of Canada) is the name given by the vast majority of students at the ability of the Medical Council of Canada exam (CMC). The LMCC – so actually the MCCQE – comes in two parts. The LMCC I is a theoretical examination done to all graduates in medicine across Canada. It also represents the final examination of pre-doctoral medical studies for Quebec medical schools. The LMCC II is an ECOS style examination (Objective Structured Clinical Examination) held in the first year of residence. After two successful tests, the Medical Council of Canada gives the candidate the title of the Medical Council of Canada Licensee and register him in the Council. Since these are some 800 students members of the FMEQ who will see their knowledge tested by the Canadian Medical Council via the LMCC I in spring 2011: these next paragraphs are directed to them. 

The LMCC is an examination done on a computer, lasting 7.5 hours, which takes place on a single day and is divided into two parts. Note that at any time, the student can go to the French version to the English version of the examination and vice versa.

Multiple-choice questions

This segment of the exam lasts 3.5 hours and accounts for 75% of the final grade for the LMCC I. It evaluates the student’s knowledge in the main disciplines of medicine such as internal medicine, surgery, paediatrics, obstetrics and gynaecology, psychiatry and population health and the ethical, legal and organizational aspects of health. This part of the exam is adaptive and is divided into seven sections, which means that the level of difficulty of a segment is adjusted according to the student’s performance in the previous section (if a question asks if the uterus is found in women or in men, it’s not a good sign!). The final grade is determined by the weighting of the questions in sections, that is to say the difficulty of the questions to which the student replied. This process aims to accurately depict the knowledge level of each student.

Clinical decision

This part of the exam lasts 4 hours and accounts for 25% of the total score for the LMCC I. It assesses the student’s ability to solve clinical situations and make decisions. In this section, several clinical cases are presented and the student has to answer a series of questions relating to it. The answers are in the form of questions in the short menu (similar to multiple choice questions, but with more choices) or open questions and short answers (the student types a response).

Tips and tricks

(Source: KAPLAN, USMLE, Step 2 CK QBook, Fourth Edition)

  1. Think about the answer while reading the question. The first line describing the socio-demographic factors is always crucial.
  2. When writing exam questions, the authors must meet certain criteria. Indeed, wrong answers must be clearly incorrect or differ significantly from the right answer for someone knowledgeable. So if you think two answers are plausible, chances are that neither are good.
  3. Use the rule of three: Never choose an answer based on a single piece of information. It takes at least three pieces of information that are consistent with the answer for it to be the right one.
  4. Start to review early!
  5. Talk to students who have done their exam in previous years.
  6. Plan your study time. Take a 10 minute break every hour, and sleep enough hours, because it allows a greater transfer of short-term memory information to long term memory.
  7. Make study groups; make presentations between each other.
  8. Plan more time to study the subjects in which you have less interest or less ease, and spend less time on subjects with which you’re comfortable. 

http://www.mcc.ca/fr/exams/qe1/reference.shtml

The role of the FMEQ

This fall, following numerous complaints from Francophone students, deans of medical faculties in Quebec and FMEQ contacted the Canadian Medical Council to denounce the French-English translation that was sometimes aberrant in certain questions in the LMCC. These complaints have led to the development by the CMC, a process of revision of francophone issues by professors of the Francophone Quebec universities and the University of Ottawa.